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Advertising at WarBusiness, Consumers, and Government in the 1940s$
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Inger L. Stole

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037122

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037122.001.0001

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The Increasing Role of the War Advertising Council

The Increasing Role of the War Advertising Council

Chapter:
(p.121) 6 The Increasing Role of the War Advertising Council
Source:
Advertising at War
Author(s):

Inger L. Stole

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037122.003.0007

This chapter details the Council’s activities throughout 1944. It studies how individual advertisers were coached to stay on course, sacrificing money, resources, and some of their creative independence to streamline the government’s campaigns and make the Council a success. Most of the government’s requests were for help with noncontroversial campaigns, which meant there was little chance that participating advertisers might arouse public resentment. But this was not always easy, especially when commercial concerns clashed with patriotic goals—a fact driven home by a highly controversial anti-venereal disease campaign. With this campaign, the Council found itself awkwardly in the middle of its obligations to the Office of War Information and the need to protect individual advertisers’ self-interest.

Keywords:   Advertising Council, government campaigns, anti-venereal disease, advertising campaign, Office of War Information, individual advertisers, commercial concerns

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