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Black RevolutionaryWilliam Patterson and the Globalization of the African American Freedom Struggle$
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Gerald Horne

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780252037924

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252037924.001.0001

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Moscow Bound

Moscow Bound

Chapter:
(p.29) 2 Moscow Bound
Source:
Black Revolutionary
Author(s):

Gerald Horne

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252037924.003.0002

This chapter studies Patterson's journey to Moscow. On November 14, 1927, Patterson was issued a U.S. passport and journeyed across the Atlantic for Moscow. His mission, as he put it, was to matriculate at the “University of Toiling People of the Far East,” whose student body was peppered with Chinese and Indians but also included Africans from throughout the world. “I was determined to have a complete house cleaning as regards capitalist thought and ideas,” said Patterson, and in this he succeeded. In 1928, he was to be found at an important gathering of the Communist International where cogitation on the critical Negro Question was a preoccupation and emerging was a logical corollary of the conflation of the problems of Africans, be they in North America or Africa itself—the so-called Black Belt thesis, or the idea that U.S. Negroes were entitled to self-determination, up to and including construction of a Negro republic in Dixie.

Keywords:   capitalist thought, Communist International, Negro Question, Black Belt, U.S. Negroes, Negro republic

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