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Autism and GenderFrom Refrigerator Mothers to Computer Geeks$
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Jordynn Jack

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038372

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038372.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 30 May 2020

Presenting Gender

Presenting Gender

Computer Geeks

Chapter:
(p.105) Chapter 3 Presenting Gender
Source:
Autism and Gender
Author(s):

Jordynn Jack

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038372.003.0004

This chapter traces a rhetorical history of the male computer geeks, engineers, and other high-tech types who came to epitomize autism in the late 1990s. It employs rhetorical analysis of key texts, including Simon Baron-Cohen's book The Essential Difference, a Wired magazine article titled “Silicon Valley Syndrome,” and a series of articles diagnosing Silicon Valley titans such as Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates as autistic by drawing on topoi of technology, geekdom, and cognitive capitalism, or the “knowledge economy.” As presented, gendered characters help make a cultural phenomenon seem livelier and more immediate to readers, often in ways that stereotype people—in this case, autistic people—in order to make a larger rhetorical point.

Keywords:   computer geeks, Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, geekdom, knowledge economy, autistic people

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