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Cannibal WritesEating Others in Caribbean and Indian Ocean Women's Writing$
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Njeri Githire

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038785

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038785.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.199) Epilogue
Source:
Cannibal Writes
Author(s):

Njeri Githire

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038785.003.0006

This chapter summarizes key themes and presents some final thoughts. This book has attempted to show the return of the cannibal in contemporary Caribbean and Indian Ocean writing, a return that is as much thematic as it is historical, economic, and political. As an archetypal othering trope, cannibalism is considered the antithesis of cosmopolitan ideals, ideals that persistently appeal to the elite for whom international mobility is synonymous with modernity, style, and indulgence. These elitist models of global interactions marginalize the knowledge and wisdom from which Caribbean and Indian Ocean societies draw. Yet through the cannibalistic incorporation of Caribbean and Indian Ocean societies within networks that mark the global world, these societies continue to play a crucial role in processes of transculturation and in the broader processes of cosmopolitan exchanges. It is hoped is that this book has brought together select texts in ways that open up new research directions.

Keywords:   cannibal, cannibalism, Caribbean writing, Indian Ocean writing, transculturation

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