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Civil Rights in the Texas BorderlandsDr. Lawrence A. Nixon and Black Activism$
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Will Guzmán

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780252038921

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252038921.001.0001

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Nixon, the NAACP, and the Courts, 1924–1934

Nixon, the NAACP, and the Courts, 1924–1934

Chapter:
(p.67) Chapter 4 Nixon, the NAACP, and the Courts, 1924–1934
Source:
Civil Rights in the Texas Borderlands
Author(s):

Will Guzmán

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252038921.003.0005

This chapter recounts how Nixon helped lay the foundation for Black voting rights in the South as the central plaintiff in two landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases: Nixon v. Herndon (1927) and Nixon v. Condon (1932), and the little-discussed case of Nixon v. McCann (1934), Nixon's third attempt to dismantle the all-white Democratic primary. Nixon, along with the NAACP, helped set legal precedent that ultimately led to the dismantling of all-white primaries throughout the entire South. The political and social climate at the local, state, and national levels during the 1920s, as well as the 1923 Texas law that barred African Americans from voting in the Democratic primaries, compelled Nixon and the NAACP to take action. As these changes were brewing in the South, many—such as the Ku Klux Klan—would come to see them as a threat.

Keywords:   Black voting rights, U.S. Supreme Court cases, Nixon v. Herndon, Nixon v. Condon, Nixon v. McCann, NAACP, all-white primaries, Democratic primaries, 1923 Texas law, Ku Klux Klan

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