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The Real Cyber WarThe Political Economy of Internet Freedom$
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Shawn M. Powers and Michael Jablonski

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780252039126

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252039126.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

Google, Information, and Power

Google, Information, and Power

Chapter:
(p.74) 3 Google, Information, and Power
Source:
The Real Cyber War
Author(s):

Shawn M. Powers

Michael Jablonski

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252039126.003.0004

This chapter examines Google's aims to dominate the global market for information services and data. Drawing from the suggestion that “information is the new oil of the Internet and the currency of the digital world,” it explores how Google's various endeavors seek to control each facet of the data market: data production, data extraction, data refinement, data infrastructure and distribution, and demand. It shows that there is no equivalent company that has ever been capable of dominance in each facet of the oil economy to the extent that Google leads in the data economy. The chapter also discusses the commodification of information in the modern internet economy and argues that Google's interest in internet freedom and connectivity lies in the fact that its survival (in the political economy sense of the word) depends on getting more and more people online to use its complimentary services.

Keywords:   information services, Internet, Google, data extraction, data infrastructure, oil economy, data economy, commodification, internet economy, internet freedom

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