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We Are What We DrinkThe Temperance Battle in Minnesota$
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Sabine N. Meyer

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780252039355

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252039355.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
We Are What We Drink
Author(s):

Sabine N. Meyer

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252039355.003.0001

This book interrogates the interplay of various identity categories in the development of the temperance movement—America's largest and longest sustained reform movement—from the nineteenth into the twentieth century. It expands the analytical framework for writing the history of the American temperance movement by adopting a holistic view. Focusing on alcohol consumption from one point in space, Minnesota, and the multiple perspectives occupying and defining this point, the book explores the myriad and ever-shifting ways that ethnicity, gender, class, religion, and place all interacted with each other in the temperance struggle. It situates the temperance movement within the public/private paradigm by analyzing the development of women's temperance activism in Minnesota from its beginnings until the onset of prohibition. The book argues that ethnicity, gender, and identity of place exerted an equal, if not at times more important, impact on contemporaries' attitudes toward temperance.

Keywords:   identity, temperance movement, alcohol consumption, Minnesota, ethnicity, gender, place, women, temperance activism, prohibition

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