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Chinese in the WoodsLogging and Lumbering in the American West$
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Sue Fawn Chung

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780252039447

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252039447.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 16 July 2020

Of Wood and Mines

Of Wood and Mines

Chapter:
(p.129) Chapter 4 Of Wood and Mines
Source:
Chinese in the Woods
Author(s):

Sue Fawn Chung

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252039447.003.0005

This chapter examines the link between mining and logging in the American West. It considers how the gold rush in California triggered new discoveries of mining areas in neighboring states of Nevada and Oregon; mining in turn ushered in large-scale western logging as wood products became a necessary supply for mines. It also looks at some of the Nevada counties that were involved in mining and logging in order to provide insights into Chinese workers, the environment, timber barons and their support of the Chinese, lumber companies, and opposition to the Chinese involved in this new industry. It shows that the need for Chinese laborers in logging diminished as the mines declined.

Keywords:   mining, logging, American West, gold rush, California, Nevada, Oregon, timber barons, lumber companies, Chinese laborers

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