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Cape Verde, Let's GoCreole Rappers and Citizenship in Portugal$
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Derek Pardue

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780252039676

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252039676.001.0001

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Suggestive Conclusions

Suggestive Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.153) Suggestive Conclusions
Source:
Cape Verde, Let's Go
Author(s):

Derek Pardue

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252039676.003.0007

This book has shown how migration, citizenship, and identity—entangled in the tensions between agency and structure—converge in the rap music of Cape Verdeans in Portugal. It has explored how Kriolu rappers and Cape Verdeans have struggled with Manichean ways of viewing the world and categorizing its people, as seen in the repeated tension between Kriolu and tuga, between diasporic migrants and cultural nationalists. The book ends with a set of theoretical conclusions and policy deliverables that bring together anthropological concepts and life experiences of Kriolu. It argues that the distinction of migrancy must be taken into consideration in the current debates on citizenship. It describes Kriolu as a Creole citizenship inside Portugal, as opposed to “Portuguese” or Portuguese iterations of interculturality. It also challenges the current ideas of “Portuguese citizenship” and instead calls for “citizenship in Portugal,” as articulated by Kriolu rappers and advocates of Kriolu identity politics. This would make Portugal a vibrant place of Creole citizenship, where trajectories of language, labor, and exchange intersect.

Keywords:   migration, identity, rap music, Cape Verde, Portugal, Kriolu rappers, Creole citizenship, interculturality, Portuguese citizenship

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