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Cold War on the AirwavesThe Radio Propaganda War against East Germany$
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Nicholas J. Schlosser

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780252039690

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252039690.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 31 May 2020

Radio Propaganda during the Ocupation, 1945–1949

Radio Propaganda during the Ocupation, 1945–1949

Chapter:
(p.13) 2 Radio Propaganda during the Ocupation, 1945–1949
Source:
Cold War on the Airwaves
Author(s):
Nicholas J. Schlosser
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252039690.003.0002

This chapter focuses on the founding of RIAS and how stations in East and West Berlin reported on the Berlin Blockade and Airlift. It shows how RIAS's formative years, from 1946 to 1949, were turbulent ones. Constant tensions existed both within and without the station with regard to what its purpose and responsibility as a radio broadcaster actually were. Personnel problems led to internal discord, rivalries, and frequent staff turnover. The rapidly deteriorating political situation in Berlin, as Allied cooperation collapsed and German political parties quickly aligned themselves with the rival superpowers, both fed and compounded these pressures. From the very beginning the inherent contradictions between objective news and propaganda came to shape the type of station RIAS became and the type of news and programming it broadcasted.

Keywords:   Berlin, RIAS, personnel problems, Allied occupation, German politics, propaganda, news broadcasts

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