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Conservative CounterrevolutionChallenging Liberalism in 1950s Milwaukee$
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Tula A. Connell

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780252039904

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252039904.001.0001

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Collective Action and the Threat to Free Enterprise

Collective Action and the Threat to Free Enterprise

Chapter:
(p.127) 6 Collective Action and the Threat to Free Enterprise
Source:
Conservative Counterrevolution
Author(s):

Tula A. Connell

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252039904.003.0007

This chapter underlines the role of anti-unionism in challenges to the New Deal consensus, further highlighting the influence of economic conservatism in the immediate postwar years. New Deal-era laws increased workers' ability to form unions and set a minimum wage for many workers, fueling an economic prosperity that by the 1950s had created the century's narrowest income gap between the wealthy and middle-income workers. Corporate and conservative interests had challenged these laws from the start, and many emerged from World War II motivated by a renewed determination to slow labor's growing momentum and return workplace economics to the private sector.

Keywords:   anti-unionism, economic conservatism, New Deal era, workplace economics, collective action, free enterprise, postwar years

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