Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Music in the Age of AnxietyAmerican Music in the Fifties$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Wierzbicki

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780252040078

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252040078.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.199) Epilogue
Source:
Music in the Age of Anxiety
Author(s):

James Wierzbicki

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252040078.003.0011

This concluding chapter urges readers to reflect on how American music from the Fifties is received today. Historians have described America's postwar years in various monikers: the age of doubt, the age of abundance, the proud decade, and the decade of fear. According to a 1972 article in Newsweek magazine, they were “The Fabulous Fifties,” a simple decade when “hip was hep and good was boss.” In America, the long decade of the Fifties was all of that. Even as it transpired, astute observers of human behavior noted the period's seemingly opposite trends. It can be argued that it is precisely these paradoxes—the national pride in America's wartime triumph versus a collective doubt about the nation's future directions—that gives the Fifties its special frisson.

Keywords:   American music, Fifties, postwar years, opposite trends, American pride, wartime triumph, collective doubt, human behavior

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.