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Mister Pulitzer and the SpiderModern News from Realism to the Digital$
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Kevin G. Barnhurst

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780252040184

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252040184.001.0001

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Events Dwindled in Print Stories

Events Dwindled in Print Stories

Chapter:
(p.77) Chapter 7 Events Dwindled in Print Stories
Source:
Mister Pulitzer and the Spider
Author(s):

Kevin G. Barnhurst

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252040184.003.0007

The rise of the Internet and cellular telecommunications has given reporters access to ever more events. The expanding ways and means—the growing reach—of newsgathering suggest a commonsense assumption: that more news events reach audiences than ever before. This chapter discusses what news insiders refer to as a “glut” they must govern. Although the form and content of the news changed, leaving room for fewer stories, fewer articles and items per page would not imply that fewer events are being reported because those remaining grew notably longer, and longer stories might include more events. Instead of running three reports on three different fires in the city, as newspapers did a century ago, an editor now might manage the information by combining all three events into one package, or a reporter might write one story built around a similarity or a theme the three events share. Did either happen? No, news stories included fewer events through the twentieth century.

Keywords:   news, news reports, newsgathering, news events, news stories, news glut

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