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Against LaborHow U.S. Employers Organized to Defeat Union Activism$
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Rosemary Feurer and Chad Pearson

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780252040818

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252040818.001.0001

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“Free Shops for Free Men”?

“Free Shops for Free Men”?

The Challenges of Strikebreaking and Union-Busting in the Progressive Era

Chapter:
(p.51) 2 “Free Shops for Free Men”?
Source:
Against Labor
Author(s):

Chad Pearson

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252040818.003.0003

Chad Pearson explores the multidimensional ways anti-union activists worked to break strikes and bust unions while attempting to turn “scabs” into “heroes.” He examines this process from different angles: from above, from below, and from somewhere in-between. Traditional employers’ associations were joined by unions of non-union workers and supposedly class-neutral Citizens’ Associations. Open-shop movement spokespersons frequently insisted that they were not engaged in a “class movement,” but Pearson disputes this claim by showing these organizations were formed by employers’ or by their middle-class allies.

Keywords:   open-shop, strikebreaking, union-busting, progressivism, astroturfing, citizens’ alliances, scabs

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