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Against LaborHow U.S. Employers Organized to Defeat Union Activism$
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Rosemary Feurer and Chad Pearson

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780252040818

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252040818.001.0001

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Employers’ Path to the Open Shop in Detroit, 1903–7

Employers’ Path to the Open Shop in Detroit, 1903–7

Chapter:
(p.78) 3 Employers’ Path to the Open Shop in Detroit, 1903–7
Source:
Against Labor
Author(s):

Thomas A. Klug

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252040818.003.0004

Thomas Klug focuses on the city of Detroit, a major battleground in employers’ fight for open-shop conditions. Challenging the conventional story that seeks to show that the city’s employers, organized in the Employers’ Association of Detroit, enjoyed victories with little difficulties during a major strike in 1907, Klug has discovered that the organization was characterized by considerable amounts of internal tension. While organization spokespersons promoted the open-shop publicly, some members quietly negotiated with skilled workers, recognizing that collective bargaining offered the promise of industrial peace. Yet all members of the Employers’ Association of Detroit proclaimed their support for the open-shop principle.

Keywords:   open-shop, strikes, employers’ associations, Public Relations, Detroit

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