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Colored No MoreReinventing Black Womanhood in Washington, D.C.$
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Treva B. Lindsey

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041020

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252041020.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 30 May 2020

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Colored No More
Author(s):

Treva B. Lindsey

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252041020.003.0001

In search of greater educational, employment, social, political, and cultural opportunities, many African American women migrated to Washington with formerly unimaginable aspirations and expectations for themselves. Colored No More establishes this search as formative to a New Negro ethos.The introductory chapter defines “New Negro” and constructs a gender-specific understanding of this historical era and identity, while introducing Washington as both a unique and a representative site for the emergence of New Negro womanhood. Challenging the temporal primacy on the Interwar period in New Negro studies, the introduction asserts the importance of examining the lives of African American women to revisit how we conceptualize the “New Negro.” This chapter also deconstructs our understanding of “colored” as simply a racial marker- gender mattered in how Blackness was experienced during the New Negro era. In search of greater educational, employment, social, political, and cultural opportunities, many African American women migrated to Washington with formerly unimaginable aspirations and expectations for themselves.

Keywords:   New Negro, black women, Washington, D.C, colored, Jim Crow, feminism, World’s Fair, modernity

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