Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Rise and Fall of the Associated Negro PressClaude Barnett's Pan-African News and the Jim Crow Paradox$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gerald Horne

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041198

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5406/illinois/9780252041198.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 24 June 2021

Red Scare Rising

Red Scare Rising

Chapter:
(p.79) Chapter 5 Red Scare Rising
Source:
The Rise and Fall of the Associated Negro Press
Author(s):

Gerald Horne

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5406/illinois/9780252041198.003.0006

This chapter explores how Claude Barnett took a position as a kind of consultant with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in Washington in 1942. At once the position brought him into closer contact with policymakers at a fraught moment and exposed him to a business—agriculture—that was ubiquitous globally. Moreover, part of his portfolio was arranging for the importation of labor from the Caribbean to plantations in Florida, which provided him with more contacts in a region where he already had established a toehold, specifically in Haiti. This then created a further opening for him to continue his own unique brand of Pan-Africanism, which had involved accumulating up-to-date intelligence (and news) and relentless networking. The succeeding years stretching until 1947 were to witness the expansion of the Associated Negro Press (ANP) and, concomitantly, Barnett's ever-lengthening list of business interests.

Keywords:   Claude Barnett, U.S. Department of Agriculture, agriculture, labor, Pan-Africanism, Associated Negro Press

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.