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Women of the StormCivic Activism after Hurricane Katrina$
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Emmanuel David

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041266

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252041266.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 24 June 2021

Conclusion

Conclusion

On moral selves and moral communities

Chapter:
(p.168) Conclusion
Source:
Women of the Storm
Author(s):

Emmanuel David

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252041266.003.0018

The conclusion reflects upon Women of the Storm’s activities and accomplishments, arguing that in a post-disaster context, elite women’s creative energies and invisible labor were channeled into causes they deemed important. The chapter contends that this unpaid work accrued value over time and that this helped reproduce social and status hierarchies in society. The chapter argues that Women of the Storm was able to achieve what it did due to the ability of its members to align a wide range of groups and institutions to support its cause. In addition to examining networks of power, the chapter assesses material and symbolic outcomes, including the passage of legislation and the construction of moral identities and communities. Finally, it considers the women’s subjective experiences of their activities and argues that this emergent group provided the context for them to engage in new forms of civic activism and to rebuild their individual and collective lives.

Keywords:   group outcomes, invisible labor, invisible careers, status, elite women, moral identities, moral communities, civic activism, material outcomes, disaster recovery, rebuilding, social change, social continuity, inequality, New Orleans

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