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Neo-PassingPerforming Identity after Jim Crow$
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Mollie Godfrey and Vershawn Ashanti Young

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041587

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252041587.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Seeing Race in Comics

Seeing Race in Comics

Passing, Witness, and the Spectacle of Racial Violence in Johnson and Pleece’s Incognegro

Chapter:
(p.117) Chapter 5 Seeing Race in Comics
Source:
Neo-Passing
Author(s):

Jennifer Glaser

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252041587.003.0008

This chapter discusses the power of the medium of comics to shed light on discussions of race, racism, and the act of passing. Glaser moves from a close reading of Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece’s recent neo-passing narrative, the graphic novel Incognegro (2008), to a wider look at the history of visual media in representing racial violence during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This chapter makes the argument that comics provide an arena for thinking both about how we see and interpret race and how visual depictions of racial violence—from photographs of lynchings to recordings of police shootings of unarmed African American men—force us to grapple with complex ethical questions.

Keywords:   comics, Incognegro, Mat Johnson, Warren Pleece, passing, violence, photography, ethics, spectacle, witness

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