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Neo-PassingPerforming Identity after Jim Crow$
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Mollie Godfrey and Vershawn Ashanti Young

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041587

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252041587.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Neo-Passing and Dissociative Identities as Affective Strategies in Frankie and Alice

Neo-Passing and Dissociative Identities as Affective Strategies in Frankie and Alice

Chapter:
(p.193) Chapter 9 Neo-Passing and Dissociative Identities as Affective Strategies in Frankie and Alice
Source:
Neo-Passing
Author(s):

Deborah Elizabeth Whaley

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252041587.003.0013

This chapter interprets dissociative identity as a neo-passing narrative through an examination of capacity and incapacity in the film Frankie and Alice. The film, starring actor Halle Berry, oscillates from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, showing neo-passing and dissociative identity in the 1970s as a response to the social, racial, and sexual landscape of the 1950s. Purportedly based on a true story, Frankie and Alice challenges spectators to consider the implications of racial and sexual trauma in passing between and through alternative identities. This chapter argues that neo-passing and dissociative identity constitute performances of identity that generate from historical and social relations and produce psychological and material manifestations of recoded difference.

Keywords:   dissociative identity disorder, mental disability, trauma, black women, passing, neo-passing, film, Frankie and Alice, jazz

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