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Migrant MarketplacesFood and Italians in North and South America$
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Elizabeth Zanoni

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041655

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252041655.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.183) Epilogue
Source:
Migrant Marketplaces
Author(s):

Elizabeth Zanoni

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252041655.003.0008

The epilogue explores the fate of Italian transnational migrant marketplaces after World War II. It connects today’s popularity of Fernet con Coca, considered Argentina’s national drink, to the historical movements of Italians and trade goods in the early-twentieth century. The Epilogue argues that due to Italy’s postwar “economic miracle,” the socio-economic mobility of second- and third-generation Italians and changes in the status of Italian food worldwide, migrant marketplaces came to exist increasingly in the imaginary and in commodified form, rather than in the actual, embodied movements of Italians and foods from Italy. However, imagined migrant marketplaces continue to play a critical role in the performance of ethnicity for descendants of Italians and in the consumption of Italianità for non-migrants in the U.S. and Argentina.

Keywords:   Fernet con Coca, Italianità, migrant marketplaces, imaginary, performance, ethnicity

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