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In a Classroom of Their OwnThe Intersection of Race and Feminist Politics in All-Black Male Schools$
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Keisha Lindsay

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041730

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252041730.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 15 June 2021

Choice, Crisis, and Urban Endangerment

Choice, Crisis, and Urban Endangerment

Chapter:
(p.26) 1 Choice, Crisis, and Urban Endangerment
Source:
In a Classroom of Their Own
Author(s):

Keisha Lindsay

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252041730.003.0002

This chapter details the material and discursive reality that informs ABMS supporters’ anti-racist and gender-biased effort to address what ails black boys in urban schools. On the one hand, neoliberal educational reform and on on-going conversations about a transracial “boy” crisis inform these supporters’ contention that “law and order” in the classroom is key to ensuring that black boys, like all boys, grow up to achieve their “natural” status as patriarchs. On the other hand, the discourse that posits black males as nearly obsolete or as an “endangered” species in the systemically racist labor market, criminal justice system, and elsewhere shapes these supporters’ willingness and ability to challenge anti-black racism in the classroom and beyond.

Keywords:   Neoliberalism, school choice, “boy” crisis, urban schools, endangered black males

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