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In a Classroom of Their OwnThe Intersection of Race and Feminist Politics in All-Black Male Schools$
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Keisha Lindsay

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780252041730

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252041730.001.0001

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The Double Dialectic between Experience and Politics

The Double Dialectic between Experience and Politics

Chapter:
(p.79) 3 The Double Dialectic between Experience and Politics
Source:
In a Classroom of Their Own
Author(s):

Keisha Lindsay

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252041730.003.0004

There is a third reason why ABMS’ black male supporters proclaim their experience of oppression in ways that help and hinder a politics of resistance. Simply put, their experiential claims rest on harmful political assumptions and facilitate liberatory political demands. After noting feminist theorists who gesture toward but do not fully recognize this dialectic reality, this chapter highlights an important exception - historian Frances White’s realization that social groups often resist their oppression by embracing the discourse of their oppressors. This chapter ends by detailing what feminists can learn from White’s insight. The answer is that black males and other social groups cannot make ideal claims about their experience of oppression precisely because these claims shape and are shaped by all manner of politics.

Keywords:   dialectic, experience, political assumptions, political demands, frances White, discourse, feminist theorists, ideal claims

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