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To Turn the Whole World OverBlack Women and Internationalism$
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Keisha N. Blain and Tiffany M. Gill

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042317

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042317.001.0001

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“They Will All Be My Color”

“They Will All Be My Color”

Nina Mae McKinney and Black Internationalism in 1930s Australia

Chapter:
(p.123) Chapter 6 “They Will All Be My Color”
Source:
To Turn the Whole World Over
Author(s):

Nicole Anae

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042317.003.0007

Nina Mae McKinney (1912-1967), American star of stage and screen, arrived in Australia in 1937 as the leading lady of a vaudeville theatrical performance. She was the first African American film actress to appear in Australia, and the sheer scope of her media interest produced reviews of performances, stories of her film career, and commentaries of her associations with other African Americans of contemporary interest. Taken together, this ephemera makes for instructive reading as iterations responsive to black internationalism as expressed by a woman who had been marginalized by Hollywood’s racial climate but reified internationally as a major talent. Through a critical examination of McKinney’s Australian press, this essay offers a comprehensive rereading of McKinney’s public presence in Australia through the lens of black internationalism.

Keywords:   Australia, Vaudeville, Nina Mae McKinney, Film, artistic expression, theatre, performance, black aesthetic, Hollywood

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