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Rethinking American Music$
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Tara Browner and Thomas L. Riis

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042324

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042324.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

Mark Tucker, Thelonious Monk, and “Misterioso”

Mark Tucker, Thelonious Monk, and “Misterioso”

Chapter:
(p.324) 15 Mark Tucker, Thelonious Monk, and “Misterioso”
Source:
Rethinking American Music
Author(s):

Jeffrey Taylor

Mark Tucker

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042324.003.0016

A previously unpublished transcription of Thelonious Monk’s “Misterioso” (recorded in 1958) by the late Mark Tucker. Notated transcriptions, especially of improvised jazz solos, have always presented a challenge for those who would understand essentially oral traditions, wanting to be true to the spirit of spontaneity and geniuses at work. Yet, the presence of recording devices throughout virtually the entire history of jazz has made the reproducibility of such solos an everyday phenomenon. The desire to put especially complex examples under the microscope of score analysis, to dig deeper, is nearly irresistible. And after all, are there not many ways to enter the house of music as we attempt to gain insight into what is inevitably an enigmatic process?

Keywords:   Transcription, Thelonious Monk, “Misterioso”, Mark Tucker, jazz solos, oral tradition

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