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Death to FascismLouis Adamic's Fight for Democracy$
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John P. Enyeart

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042508

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042508.001.0001

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Modernism and Exile

Modernism and Exile

The Origins of Louis Adamic’s Politics, 1898–1932

Chapter:
(p.11) 1 Modernism and Exile
Source:
Death to Fascism
Author(s):

John P. Enyeart

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042508.003.0002

Chapter 1 examines how Louis Adamic used the paradox of immigrants providing the labor to make the United States the wealthiest nation on earth while receiving mostly misery in return. The xenophobes who dominated US politics after World War I made it clear that Slavs were not quite “white” and thus not quite American. Adamic and his fellow countrymen found themselves in between white and black on the US racial spectrum and trapped in between Slovenian and US cultures. During the 1920s, he grappled with this liminality by employing literary modernism and writing from the perspective of an exiled peasant. In 1933, he added a political dimension to work when writing about slovenstvo (Slovene spirit) at a crucial moment in his homeland’s history.

Keywords:   Louis Adamic, immigrants, exile, in betweenness, acculturation, Slovenians, modernism, Americanization, slovenstvo

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