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Black HuntingtonAn Appalachian Story$
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Cicero M., III Fain

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042591

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042591.001.0001

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Institutional Development, Public Space, and Political Aspiration in Early Huntington, 1870–Early 1900s

Institutional Development, Public Space, and Political Aspiration in Early Huntington, 1870–Early 1900s

Chapter:
(p.93) Chapter 5 Institutional Development, Public Space, and Political Aspiration in Early Huntington, 1870–Early 1900s
Source:
Black Huntington
Author(s):

Cicero M. Fain III

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042591.003.0005

This chapter examines the metamorphosis of the black Huntingtonians varied responses to rising Jim Crowism during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Benefiting from increasing affluence, kin and augmented family networks, strong religious convictions, and education, Huntington’s black working class, in conjunction with working class blacks throughout the Ohio River Valley, engaged in a variety of tactics and strategies to progress. It contends that in building institutions, entering into the public space, and agitating for political inclusion black Huntingtonians formed the “building blocks” for self-improvement, community formation, and racial uplift. In the process, they transformed Huntington into a regional black socio-cultural hub, produced an embryonic black professional class, and further strengthened black Huntingtonians’ cultural, social, and political linkages with the region’s African American population.

Keywords:   Douglass High School, Carter G. Woodson, Colored Orphans Home, “opportunity screens,” black professional class, benevolent organizations, First Baptist Church, C.C. Barnett, black newspapers

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