Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Raced to Death in 1920s Hawai iInjustice and Revenge in the Fukunaga Case$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jonathan Y. Okamura

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042607

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042607.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

The Insanity Question

The Insanity Question

Chapter:
(p.117) 5. The Insanity Question
Source:
Raced to Death in 1920s Hawai i
Author(s):

Jonathan Y. Okamura

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042607.003.0006

This chapter considers whether Fukunaga was legally sane or insane when he killed Gill Jamieson, a lingering issue because of the ninety-minute examination given him by the three psychiatrists who testified he was legally sane. The chapter reviews the study by University of Hawai‘i professor Lockwood Myrick Jr., who contended Fukunaga was legally insane because he was compelled by a force he could not withstand—his desire for revenge against the Hawaiian Trust Co. Besides the inability to differentiate between right and wrong, being unable to resist a compelling force was another criterion of legal insanity according to Hawai‘i law. The chapter argues that, based on his actions and statements, Fukunaga appeared to know the difference between right and wrong and that killing Gill was wrong.

Keywords:   legally insane, sane, psychiatrists, Lockwood Myrick Jr., compelling force, revenge

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.