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Black Sexual EconomiesRace and Sex in a Culture of Capital$
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Adrienne D. Davis and BSE Collective

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042645

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042645.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 05 March 2021

In the Life

In the Life

Queering Violence in the Stories of G. Winston James

Chapter:
(p.187) Chapter 11 In the Life
Source:
Black Sexual Economies
Author(s):

Darius Bost

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042645.003.0012

This essay provides a moment for readers to rethink the scholarly or disciplinary methodologies, as well as national ideologies, that shape black sexuality studies and examinations of sexual economies. As communities throughout the African Diaspora continue to work toward sexual decolonization, they do so in ways that highlight the tensions and conflicts of a public/private binary embedded in sexual economies. This essay compels readers to see what is at stake for persons of color in the Caribbean researching what has been articulated as a private concern “sexuality.” In theorizing intellectual labor on sexuality, the author prioritizes the local, the political, and the socio-cultural landscape so as to demand an ethical relationship between scholars and their subjects. In sum, the essay explores how black sexual intellectuals can blur the boundaries between public and private binaries. In articulating the conflicts between making sex public, and thus research on sexuality accessible, the author reminds readers of the importance of embodiment and activism for African Diasporic communities where the end goal is sexual decolonization.

Keywords:   Caribbean feminisms, sexual politics, Caribbean sexual freedom, gender and sexual justice, Black Caribbean sexualities

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