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Over Here, Over ThereTransatlantic Conversations on the Music of World War I$
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William Brooks, Christina Bashford, and Gayle Magee

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042706

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042706.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 18 May 2022

Profitable Patriotism

Profitable Patriotism

John Philip Sousa and the Great War

Chapter:
(p.73) Chapter 4 Profitable Patriotism
Source:
Over Here, Over There
Author(s):

Patrick Warfield

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042706.003.0005

World War I gave John Philip Sousa, always an astute businessman, several opportunities to reshape his image and rebuild his career. Sousa embraced first neutrality, and then preparedness, notably in championing “Wake Up, America” during his residency at New York’s Hippodrome. When the country entered the war, Sousa was acclaimed for his quintessential patriotism, and he enlisted in the Naval Reserve to train bandsmen at the Great Lakes Training Station. He even changed his appearance, shaving off his celebrated beard; and he joined in anti-German jingoism, writing a wedding march as a substitute for Wagner and Mendelssohn. By war’s end, he had recaptured the public imagination and rebuilt his legend for the years to come.

Keywords:   World War I, United States, musical response, John Philip Sousa, neutrality, preparedness, New York, Hippodrome, patriotism, Naval Reserve

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