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Over Here, Over ThereTransatlantic Conversations on the Music of World War I$
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William Brooks, Christina Bashford, and Gayle Magee

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042706

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042706.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 18 May 2022

The Beginning of the End of Something

The Beginning of the End of Something

Chapter:
(p.224) Chapter 10 The Beginning of the End of Something
Source:
Over Here, Over There
Author(s):

Deniz Ertan

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042706.003.0012

World War I, with its attendant music and noise, was followed immediately by an influenza epidemic (the “Spanish flu”) that was met by a resounding silence. To meet the epidemic, theatres closed and gatherings were prohibited; Western culture itself paused until the danger passed. Realistic portrayals and responses through music were rare (in contrast to the war), but they may be detectable in works by artists as diverse as Charles Tomlinson Griffes and Blind Willie Johnson. The nationalism of the conflict yielded to a new transnationalism, neither peaceful nor stable, described most memorably by Randolph Bourne, himself a victim of the disease.

Keywords:   World War I, influenza epidemic, Spanish flu, musical response, silence, disease, Charles Tomlinson Griffes, Blind Willie Johnson, transnationalism, Randolph Bourne

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