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Emotional BodiesThe Historical Performativity of Emotions$
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Dolores Martín-Moruno and Beatriz Pichel

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042898

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042898.001.0001

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Making a Collective Emotional Body

Making a Collective Emotional Body

Francis of Assisi Celebrating Christmas in Greccio (1223)

Chapter:
(p.151) 7. Making a Collective Emotional Body
Source:
Emotional Bodies
Author(s):

Piroska Nagy

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042898.003.0008

Asking how emotional communities are born and how an emotional event may help something new to emerge, this chapter analyses the episode when Francis of Assisi celebrates Christmas in the little town of Greccio according to the earliest sources--first, his biography written in 1228-29 by Thomas of Celano, and then in a few early vitae and iconographic evidence. Doing so, it suggests that shared emotional events, through the work of emotions and senses, create a new emotional body, which can either last, or remain ephemeral. Studying the way different sources treat the event gives the occasion to observe what can be called a Franciscan politics of emotion.

Keywords:   Emotional Community, Christmas, Miracle, Embodiment, Crib, Franciscan, Event, Change, Politics of Emotion

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