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Chicago CatólicoMaking Catholic Parishes Mexican$
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Deborah E. Kanter

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042973

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042973.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 17 June 2021

Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.141) Epilogue
Source:
Chicago Católico
Author(s):

Deborah E. Kanter

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042973.003.0007

Mexicans and other Latinos constitute 44 percent of Chicago Catholics. Facing a wave of parish closures, the archdiocese’s vitality rests heavily on Latinos. In Pilsen, once home to thirteen parishes, today only three parishes remain. This barrio’s Mexican identity is further challenged by gentrification. Yet Mexican Catholic devotion flourishes in Pilsen in public and unexpected ways, from house shrines and Day of the Dead altars to street Masses and citywide pilgrimages. What developed decades ago in a couple of parishes, most notably, St. Francis, impacts the entire archdiocese. Latinos constitute 17 percent of the US population, and the Mexican-descent population has settled in every state. Chicago’s century-old Mexican population offers lessons for countless dioceses and parishes in the midst of ethnic integration and succession around the nation.

Keywords:   Mexicans, Latinos, Catholic, Archdiocese of Chicago, Pilsen, parish closure, parishes, gentrification, devotions, pilgrimages

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