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Graphic NewsHow Sensational Images Transformed Nineteenth-Century Journalism$
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Amanda Frisken

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780252042980

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252042980.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Epilogue

Epilogue

Legacies of Visual Journalism and the Sensational Style

Chapter:
(p.195) Epilogue
Source:
Graphic News
Author(s):

Amanda Frisken

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252042980.003.0007

The Epilogue explores key events in the late 1890s as newspapers transitioned from illustrations to photographs, revisiting the familiar point of origin for sensational or “yellow” journalism. With the emphasis on images firmly established, news “art” (i.e., photos or illustrations) increasingly determined coverage of events, and sometimes transformed reporting itself. Whether publishing stories about a Cuban rebel heroine (Evangelina Cosio y Cisneros), or the sinking of the U.S.S. Maine, the World, the Journal, and other dailies re-set standards for news visualization. Their practices incorporated parameters, established over previous decades, that had changed how consumers came to see the news. Even as interpretive news illustrations faded, the conventions of visual journalism they had established remained firmly in place.

Keywords:   yellow journalism, new journalism, news visualization, news illustrations, news photography, New York World, New York Journal, Evangelina Cosio y Cisneros, U.S.S. Maine, Spanish-American War

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