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Disability Rights and Religious Liberty in EducationThe Story behind Zobrest v. Catalina Foothills School District$
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Bruce J Dierenfield and David A. Gerber

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780252043208

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252043208.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 27 June 2022

Into the Mainstream

Into the Mainstream

Chapter:
(p.45) 2 Into the Mainstream
Source:
Disability Rights and Religious Liberty in Education
Author(s):

Bruce J. Dierenfield

David A. Gerber

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252043208.003.0003

Chapter 2 examines the Zobrests’ decision-making as they sought opportunities among various school systems available to them for mainstreaming their deaf son, Jim. We follow Jim’s education from the Arizona School for the Deaf and the Blind to the Catalina Foothills public schools in suburban Tucson and analyze the Zobrests’ decision to remove Jim from the public schools and place him in Salpointe Catholic High School. The general attraction of Roman Catholic schools in the cultural and social climate of the 1980s is discussed, as is the expectation that a Catholic high school would offer a deaf-friendly educational and social environment. Jim’s IEPs, his performance in school, and his social situation, as the only deaf student in each educational setting, are analyzed.

Keywords:   Zobrest, Mainstreaming, Arizona School for the Deaf and the Blind, public schools, Salpointe Catholic High School, Roman Catholic schools, Deaf, IEP

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