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Remaking Muslim LivesEveryday Islam in Postwar Bosnia and Herzegovina$
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David Henig

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780252043291

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252043291.001.0001

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The Sultan Is Back

The Sultan Is Back

Chapter:
(p.149) Afterword The Sultan Is Back
Source:
Remaking Muslim Lives
Author(s):

David Henig

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252043291.003.0008

This afterword discusses some of the recent events described in this book that have continued to unfold in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The most important one is the increasing interference of Turkey’s neo-Ottoman politico-religious agenda, which clashes with localized forms of Islamic practice. The afterword takes these events as a magnifying glass for the historical and political ramifications of the book. It argues that the large-scale homogenizing projects--imperial Ottoman and national post-Ottoman, secular socialist and ethnonational postsocialist--are all embedded in the village landscape, and in the local historical imagination and consciousness. They have left behind uncanny historical traces that continue to be contested and negotiated in villagers’ aspirations, articulations, and self-conceptions of what it means to be Muslim and to live a Muslim life. The afterword thus argues that a historical-ethnographic labor documenting and tracking the persistent features and durabilities of these homogenizing political projects needs to be understood in terms of their entwinements with grassroots counter-historicities embodied in villagers’ actions, rituals, and ethical repertoires.

Keywords:   Bosnia and Herzegovina, everyday historical work, Islam, Muslim politics, Neo-Ottomanism, re-enactment, sacrifice, social change and continuity

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