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Workers against the CityThe Fight for Free Speech in Hague v. CIO$
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Donald W. Rogers

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780252043468

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252043468.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 24 September 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Workers against the City
Author(s):

Donald W. Rogers

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252043468.003.0001

This introduction reframes the history of the U.S. Supreme Court decision Hague v. CIO (1939) that guaranteed speech and assembly rights in public municipal forums under federal law for the first time. It lifts the story out of standard treatment as a product of police repression of labor organizers by city boss Frank Hague, exploring instead the case’s broader roots in multiple changes in city governance, policing, the labor movement, civil liberties law, and anticommunism and antifascism politics of the late New Deal era. It urges examination of all sides of the controversy, winners and losers, scrutinizing evidence beyond antiboss sources, including varied newspapers, municipal reports, trial transcripts, labor archives, and federal court records. It views the case as part of a constitutional watershed.

Keywords:   boss, city, police, civil liberties, labor, workers, speech, assembly, anticommunism, antifascism

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