Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
I Died a Million TimesGangster Noir in Midcentury America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Robert Miklitsch

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780252043611

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252043611.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 26 June 2022

Coda

Coda

Post-’50s Syndicate, Rogue Cop, and “Big Caper” Films

Chapter:
(p.233) Coda
Source:
I Died a Million Times
Author(s):

Robert Miklitsch

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252043611.003.0011

The dialectic between the individual and collective in gangster noir continues in the post-’50s period. The individualist emphasis is most obvious in the syndicate and rogue cop film, achieving something of a classical synthesis in Samuel Fuller’s Underworld U.S.A. (1961) and, courtesy of Robert Mitchum’s bravura performance as Max Cady, a baroque climax in J. Lee Thompson’s Cape Fear (1961). Though the postclassic heist movie can be categorized in terms of its “cosmopolitan,” “Las Vegas,” and “civil rights” variants, Lewis Milestone’s Ocean’s 11 (1960) not only exhibits these various subgenres but also proffers a postmodern gloss on the oppositional collective implicit in The Phenix City Story and Odds against Tomorrow.

Keywords:   Syndicate, rogue cop, civil rights, Underworld U.S.A, Cape Fear, Ocean’s 11

Illinois Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.