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Industrial Strength BluegrassSouthwestern Ohio's Musical Legacy$
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Fred Bartenstein and Curtis W. Ellison

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780252043642

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: September 2021

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252043642.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 26 June 2022

All the Way to the Fence

All the Way to the Fence

Bluegrass Broadcasting in the Miami Valley

Chapter:
(p.23) 3. All the Way to the Fence
Source:
Industrial Strength Bluegrass
Author(s):

Daniel Mullins

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252043642.003.0003

Broadcasting was significant to creating a bluegrass music market. Radio personalities reminded Appalachians of home with familiar music and colorful dialect. Live programs on Cincinnati’s WLW showcased early Appalachian musicians. WCKY disc jockeys Nelson King and Wayne Raney played bluegrass records in the 1940s and 1950s, while promoting Jimmie Skinner’s record sales outlets. Paul Braden founded Middletown’s WPFB in 1947, Braden and announcer Smokey Ward featured numerous future bluegrass stars on the WPFB Jamboree. Influential radio personality Tommy Sutton joined WPFB in the 1950s, and took the Osborne Brothers’ demo to Nashville. Paul “Moon” Mullins joined WPFB in 1964. His folksy manner, ad-lib commercials, and humorous stories made him a regional star. His son Joe Mullins keeps tradition alive on today’s Real Roots Radio Network.

Keywords:   WLW, WCKY, Nelson King, Wayne Raney, Paul Braden, WPFB, Smokey Ward, Tommy Sutton, Paul “Moon” Mullins

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