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Being La DominicanaRace and Identity in the Visual Culture of Santo Domingo$
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Rachel Afi Quinn

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9780252043819

Published to Illinois Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.5622/illinois/9780252043819.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM ILLINOIS SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.illinois.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Illinois University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ISO for personal use.date: 26 June 2022

The Camera Obscura

The Camera Obscura

Teatro Maleducadas’ Production of La Casa de Bernarda Alba

Chapter:
(p.144) 5 The Camera Obscura
Source:
Being La Dominicana
Author(s):

Rachel Afi Quinn

Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
DOI:10.5622/illinois/9780252043819.003.0006

This chapter examines a 2013 Santo Domingo performance of Federico García Lorca’s play La Casa de Bernarda Alba by the Dominican theater collective Teatro Maleducadas and its manifestation online. Dominican women’s bodies transform the meaning of this surrealist text and its staging, while hierarchies of color hold new significance for Dominican viewers that compliment Lorca’s vision for his script and its elements of the photographic. Not only do representations of Spanish womanhood in this performance resonate but also the matriarchal violence on display equally sustains patriarchal practices in Dominican society. Insights from members of the theater collective, including award-winning director Isabel Spencer, highlight the significance of the performance, Dominican women in the arts, and the ways that various collective members make claims on blackness and Afro-Caribbean identity.

Keywords:   Theatre, Federico García Lorca, Whiteness, Afro-Caribbean, Patriarchy, Photograph, Isabel Spencer, Violence, Color, blackness

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